Solar Power Is for Cold Climates, Too

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The warm, sunny southwestern U.S. is a hotspot for solar power, but businesses in chillier, gloomier regions can also benefit from the switch to renewable energy. That’s especially true for companies in remote areas, where fossil fuels are more expensive. With the cost of solar panels continuing to fall, a clean tech makeover can cut carbon emissions while saving money, too.

Solar power in Alaska?

Alaska has become the epicenter of important environmental battles over the use of fossil fuels, including wildlife conservation and climate change.

Until recently, though, it seemed that Alaska’s residents and businesses had little opportunity to participate in the renewable energy transition, considering its cold climate and far-flung villages.

Nevertheless, Alaska has become a test bed for the financial benefits of small scale, local solar power.

One such project is getting under way this month in the village of Ambler, population 287, located near Kobuk Valley National Park (shown above).

Ambler is located 45 miles north of the Arctic Circle, in the Northwest Arctic Borough. Access is primarily by barge, plane, small boat and snowmachine.

At first glance, the region may not seem ideal for solar power. Though total precipitation is relatively low at 9 inches per year, that includes an average of 47 inches of snow.

Still, about 70 homes in Ambler are being fitted out with their own solar arrays this year.

Yes, solar power in Alaska!

With a capacity of 1 kilowatt each, the new household solar arrays are miniscule. However, they will have an outsized impact on energy consumption in the village.

The solar arrays are just part of a broader energy efficiency initiative for Ambler. Each home is also getting new LED lights and a heat pump.

With the help of solar power during the day, the heat pumps can work without drawing electricity from the local grid.

The heat pumps will be operated only part of the year, when the temperature is above zero degrees Fahrenheit. However, that is enough to realize significant savings.

The combination of heat pumps, LEDs, and solar arrays cost each home about $8,200. The annual fuel saving per home is expected to range from $2,000 to $3,000, meaning that the systems will pay for themselves in just a few years.

Cleaner and safer

Aside from the financial benefits, the Ambler solar power project also involves public health improvements.

Alaska Public Media recently took a look at a home in Ambler that has pilot-tested the system over the past two years and noted that the heat pumps can be used to filter indoor air. That’s an important improvement for homes that rely on wood stoves for heating.

The heat pumps can also provide filtration for outdoor air, a significant benefit for communities like Ambler with dusty, unpaved roads.

Overall comfort is another consideration. By reducing the financial pressure on household energy bills, the solar panels enable residents to keep indoor temperatures at a more healthful level.

As for the impact of Ambler’s cold, snowy climate on solar panel output, researchers are beginning to accumulate evidence that solar panels can function more efficiently in cold weather. Snow can help by reflecting additional light onto the solar panels, too.

Big plans for small scale solar

On the other end of the scale, the largest solar array in Alaska began construction earlier this year at the village of Hughes, 210 miles from Fairbanks by air.

The U.S. Department of Energy is supporting the project, which consists of a 120-kilowatt solar array this year and an equal amount of energy storage. The system will integrate with the local grid to help cut overall power costs.

Hughes (population 110), currently uses more than 40,000 gallons of diesel annually to generate electricity for the community, all of which is transported on aging planes that date back to the 1950’s — which involves using even more fossil fuel.

With those costs involved, it’s little wonder that the residents of Hughes pay more than 70 cents per kilowatt hour for electricity.

By producing some of its electricity through local solar energy, the village will cut its costs while reducing carbon emissions from diesel fuel. It will also reduce emissions related to fuel transportation as well.

Although the system is tiny compared to the utility-scale arrays elsewhere in the U.S., it will save about $54,000 annually over its 20-year lifespan. That will go a long way in Hughes.

As the Hughes and Ambler projects demonstrate, location does not have to be an obstacle for businesses seeking solar power and other sources of clean technologies. Even if renewable energy is available only part-time, it can still make a big difference in overall energy costs and carbon emissions.

A corollary to that is the opportunity for businesses to enter new markets in remote locations — or any location, for that matter — by taking advantage of the falling cost of renewable energy.

Image credit: LCGS Russ/Wiki Commons

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How Digital Technologies Can Enable Other Sectors to Accelerate Climate Action

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An International Energy Outlook report from the U.S. Energy Information Administration projects that world energy consumption will grow by 28 percent between 2015 and 2040, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will grow accordingly because fossil fuels still account for more than three-quarters of world energy consumption through 2040. Similarly, in the mobile wireless world, each successive generation (3G, 4G etc.) has brought an increase in energy consumption even as it enables more services and reaches more people.

The exponential climate action roadmap published in late September tells us that global GHG emissions need to peak by 2020 at the latest and reduce by 50 percent before 2030. Yet the world is not on track to meet these goals. The good news? The information and communication technologies (ICT) sector is doing its part. The sector is already on its way to reducing carbon emissions.

Digital technology companies only accounts for a small percentage of greenhouse gas emissions. According to the roadmap, the ICT industry’s own footprint has stayed flat for several years at 1.4 percent of overall global emissions in spite of exponential data growth during that same time.

Now, it’s time to focus on the impact the ICT sector can have on other industries. The footprint of digital industries is comparatively small, but the handprint could be huge. Of the 36 solutions identified in the roadmap required to slash greenhouse gas emissions 50% by 2030, one-third can be enabled by ICT technology, meaning the impact ICT can have on other industries can be far reaching.

As the leading creator of carbon emissions, the energy industry, which currently accounts for two thirds of global greenhouse gas emissions, would be greatly impacted by ICT technology.  In addition to being one of the largest purchasers of renewable energy to power networks and data centers. The ICT industry is also focused on increasing network performance through energy efficient hardware modernization and software solutions.

5G, the latest generation of mobile wireless, will accelerate the development of the Internet of Things (IoT), which in turn will allow us to better monitor energy consumption through an estimated 4.1 billion cellular IoT connections globally by 2024. When combined with AI and machine learning, this will kick off a fourth industrial revolution, where billions of connections and sensors will provide us with real-time data and remote operating capabilities necessary to make big leaps in energy efficiency and exponential climate action.

But they are not alone, ICT can benefit other sectors, such as benefiting the transportation by empowering smart transportation, optimizing routes and traffic or monitoring performance of vehicles for energy efficiency. It can benefit agriculture by automating practices and utilizing IoT to optimize agricultural practices, such as watering plants and milling soil. ICT can benefit companies across the country simply by empowering smart buildings that monitor and limit energy usage.

The possibilities are far-reaching, and but they must be accelerated, in part by the widespread adoption of 5G, to reach the necessary scale by 2030. A few early success stories:

  • Einride's T-pod: Einride is creating a sustainable transportation ecosystem with 5G providing the connectivity and reliability to safely introduce T-pods onto public roads, paving the way for 90% reduction in carbon emissions and elimination of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions.
  • Boliden Mining Automation: Fully automated/remotely controlled trucks (connected by 5G) drive more efficiently, this smoother transport flow, steadier speed and less movement means lower fuel consumption eliminating an estimated 9,400 metric tons of CO2 emissions at Boliden’s Aitik mine.
  • Bladed Disks (BLISKs) Manufacturing: BLISKs are critical components of turbines like aircraft jet engines. Automated production with real time monitoring and control enabled by 5G can reduce manufacturing time, and just a 2% increase in efficiency can eliminate 16 million metric tons of carbon emissions annually.  

Digital technologies can help reduce overall global greenhouse gas emissions by up to 15 percent through solutions in energy, manufacturing, agriculture and land use, buildings, services and transportation. If done right, this could account for a third of the GHG emission reduction required by 2030. Enabled by 5G and the IoT, our sector can help support a sustainable future for everyone.

Image credit: Unsplash

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Ahiflower: A Regenerative Solution for Omega-3 Supplements?

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The global omega-3 supplement market reached new heights in 2019 and isn’t expected to slow down with a projected 7.4 percent annual growth rate through 2024. Consumers are looking to omega-3 supplements to address their health concerns, such as arthritis, cholesterol and ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder).

However, consumers are becoming increasingly aware that the current business-as-usual approach of the reduction industry (the industry that processes fish for supplement oil) is unsustainable. One study reported that global demand for fish-free omega-3 supplements, including algae-based oil supplements, is accelerating at 9 percent annually, while another study found that 69 percent of U.S. supplement users' purchases "were influenced by sustainability factors." 

"The interest is shifting from the type to the source of omega fatty acids across the health-conscious consumer base around the world, which is shaping the future of the market for plant-based omega-3 ingredients," a Transparency Market Research study reported. 

This shift is crucial since the reduction industry processes 25 million metric tons of fish annually, usually those species described as “bottom-feeders,” to produce oil for 83.5 percent of omega-3 supplements—diminishing food sources for fish and marine mammals and threatening those at the top of the food chain.

Nature's Crops International sees Ahiflower as the crop to stop the reduction industry

Enter Nature's Crops International (NCI), a fatty oils manufacturer that partners with thousands of farmers to grow specialty crops, including Ahiflower—an oilseed crop with more than four times the omega-3s found in flaxseed. NCI views Ahiflower as the crop that can curb global reliance on fish-oil omega-3 supplements.

During a presentation at the Regenerative Earth Summit, a two-day conference that brought together leaders in the circular economy and regenerative agriculture, NCI CEO Andrew Hebard explained his company's long-term goal is to grow 1 million acres of Ahiflower. 

"If we can get anywhere close to our goal, we'll take a huge amount of pressure off the oceans where we are somewhat indiscriminately harvesting these forage fish to grind up for the omega-3 industry," Hebard explained to TriplePundit. 

Currently, 50 farmers, located mostly in the United Kingdom, partner with NCI to grow Ahiflower. NCI teaches its farmers how to incorporate regenerative growing practices, such as promoting biodiversity on their farms and maintaining continual ground cover. NCI also enters into “holistic partnerships” with farmers instead of buy-sell agreements, which means price stability and continuous support for farmers, Hebard said. 

New science and applications should catalyze Ahiflower’s growth 

The exciting news is that regenerative Ahiflower production is scalable. Not only does one acre of Ahiflower produce as much oil as 40,000 mackerel or sardines, it can also fortify food. NCI entered into a partnership with Blue Pacific Flavors to incorporate Ahiflower oil into plant-based milk alternatives and nutritional desserts, expanding Ahiflower oil’s applicability.

The biggest challenge to accelerate demand is educating consumers that Ahiflower omega-3 supplements have a similar chemical composition as fish-based omega-3 supplements and can offer the same health benefits. Hebard remains optimistic as more studies surface that prove Ahiflower’s value. 

"There's some really interesting science emerging about how plant-derived omegas are metabolized, and we feel this will give consumers a lot of confidence knowing their nutritional requirements can be obtained from good plant sources," Hebard told Danielle Masterson of NutraIngredients. 

Image credit: Fornax/Wiki Commons

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Veterans Help Us Be Our Best

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By Laura Knutson

Imagine you sign up to serve your country at age 18. You go to boot camp and push your physical and mental limits to an extreme. You spend years on a ship. Maybe you serve in a war zone.

You come home, start a family, get deployed again. Months later, you’re back at your local grocery store, trying to readjust to an old lifestyle that’s suddenly foreign.

To many veterans, this transition back to the civilian world is no easy feat. And at the core is finding a job that fits, which can be the biggest hurdle of all.

At General Mills, we’re proud to employ and support hundreds of veterans and transitioning military members in the U.S.

We spoke with several veterans throughout the company to find out what made them successful in the workplace; discipline and collaboration were common themes.

Teresa Viola is based at our headquarters in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She works on our supply chain team, using her experience from the U.S. Navy. Hear from her in this video.

We also caught up with three veterans working at our Albuquerque, New Mexico plant. Watch videos featuring Russell HollomanAndrew Amador and Jim McGonigle.

When talking with our employee veterans, our Veterans Network came up a lot. This is a special community within General Mills that provides mentorship for veteran applicants and new hires, ongoing support that’s tailor-made for veteran employees and their families, and volunteer work with community programs, like Tee It Up for Troops.

Joel Stamp is the president of the General Mills Veterans Network, and has been an active member of the Army National Guard for more than 20 years. He told us about how the veterans network began and grew throughout the company, in this audio clip.

Our Veterans Network encourages honest conversation on difficult cultural topics – like mental health and the Take a Knee movement – to build a truly supportive and inclusive environment.

Efforts like these are why we’ve been awarded a VIQTORY Military Friendly company for seven years, and, for the first time this year, a Best Corporation for Veterans Business Enterprises by the National Veteran Owned Business Association for our work with more than 70 veteran suppliers.

Pat Higgins rose up the ranks in the U.S. Army to become a tank platoon leader and intelligence officer, and then worked his way up at our Wellston, Ohio, plant to lead a processing line making Totino’s Pizza Rolls.

Pat Higgins
Pat Higgins (L) of General Mills

While at General Mills, he was called to deploy, and when he told his manager, “There was not a single question asked outside of, ‘How can we support you?’.”

In fact, Higgins’ manager stayed in touch with him through his deployment, and his fellow employees frequently checked in on his two young kids and expecting wife. And he received plenty of care packages with his favorite snack, LÄRABARs, while serving abroad.

Aimee Mortenson, a research and developer for Lucky Charms, had a similar experience, but from a different viewpoint.

Her husband, who doesn’t work at General Mills, never expected to get deployed based on the nature of his military role. But he was called for duty suddenly, and at a time when they were caring for a little one at home.

“My co-workers have been as close as family helping me get through this tough time, offering to mow my lawn, shovel my driveaway, get my groceries, babysit. As a new mom, all these small acts have been a game-changer while my husband is away. And General Mills’ workplace flexibility has enabled me to balance the load,” says Mortenson.

On this Veterans Day, we salute our veteran employees, and their families, and give thanks for their work at home and when away.

Laura Knutson is a corporate communications associate in Global Communications at General Mills, based in Minneapolis. She supports initiatives for business and financial communications. She began her career at General Mills in 2016.

Previously published on the Taste of General Mills blog and the 3BL Media newsroom.

Image credits: General Mills

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Four High-Tech Companies Unite to Buy Wind Energy in Texas

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The corporate sector is pushing renewable energy full steam ahead into the next phase. Apple, eBay, Samsung Austin Semiconductor and Sprint have announced a joint agreement to purchase power from a new wind farm in Texas owned by Apex Clean Energy. The wind farm, roughly located midway between San Antonio and El Paso, is expected to come online in 2021. A partnership like this, from several companies with offices in the Austin metro area, is an innovative way for companies to pool their energy demands and support larger-scale renewable energy projects. It brings down the cost to each partner company and enables more renewable energy to be brought onto the grid.

The 500-megawatt White Mesa Wind project is expected to begin operations during 2021 in Crockett County, Texas.

Apple also recently announced plans to open a new $1 billion office in Austin, a decision that will bring 15,000 jobs to the region. The tech giant already powers 100 percent of its global operations with renewable energy; for this project, Apple reached out to the other business partners to join its pursuit of additional renewables investment in Texas. Hence this strategy fits well with the other tech companies’ commitments; for example, eBay aims to reach 100 percent renewable energy at its offices and data centers by 2025.

In addition to bringing that additional 500 megawatts of wind power to the Texas grid, this investment by four market-leading brands focuses more attention to renewable energy’s potential. Though Texas is the top wind energy-producing state in the country, state lawmakers have repeatedly tried to limit its reach. Solar has only recently become a player in Texas despite the state’s vast capacity for this source of power. This increased deployment of solar is due more to market forces, including the drop in the price of solar compared to coal and natural gas, as well as the reality that coal no longer makes economic sense. Investments like the one announced by these companies will only help drive costs down further.

The investments Texas has made in renewables may not generate big headlines when compared to other states like California. This news may even make some clean tech advocates on the west coast yawn. After all, the Golden State has stood out by setting statewide policies to achieve higher renewable energy penetration rates as well as greenhouse gas emission reductions targets. This new Texas wind farm project, however, is a step in the right direction.

But Texas, though many citizens are proud of its wind energy sector, is not typically a champion of environmental solutions at the state leadership level. In fact, the top government leaders in Texas have been vocal in their opposition about taking on climate change. Despite being on the frontline of climate change—from droughts to floods, from hurricanes to heat waves—the conventional energy sector, based largely in Houston, has overall resisted calls for greater investment in renewable energy.

Nevertheless, change is occurring at the local level across Texas. And here is where the corporate sector, along with cities, is changing the face of energy in the state: All the major Texas cities have either set climate goals or are in the process of setting them, and those same cities welcome corporations who align with those goals. The high-tech sector, centered in Austin, which is affectionally called “Silicon Hills," has more incentive than many other industries to invest in renewable energy, given their emissions footprint due to operations such as data centers, which have a very high electricity demand.

In the absence of political leadership in taking action on climate change, particularly when it comes to investments in renewable energy, corporations are stepping in to fill the void. High-profile technology companies have the potential to make a difference in the states where they operate, and this announcement shows that they are seizing such opportunities.

Image credit: White Mesa Wind

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The Circular Economy – Lessons from the Past for a Sustainable Future

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It wasn’t always like this. For much of human history, people lived sustainably, following the circular pattern of the seasons. In the Bronze Age, recycling as we know it today was first practiced as metalwork gave way to the use of stone in tool making. Stone Age flint tools were made from old hand axes and old pottery was ground down to reuse in clay for new pots. Practices at the core of a circular economy, such as repairing, recycling, refurbishing or repurposing, are as old as the use of tools. Somewhere, mankind's need for ever-expanding markets and raw materials has set us on a path to destruction.

The industrial revolution in the late 18th century irrevocably reshaped society and linked human progress with economic growth and material advancement. Then, Imperial Europe began to take limited raw materials from distant lands with no regard for the effect industries have on indigenous people. The cost of industrial development was the unprecedented degradation of the environment at a global scale caused primarily by the exploitation of raw materials.

The rise of industrial capitalism mostly benefited industrial countries, further widening the gap between the rich and the poor. In the long term, this uneven distribution of wealth and the resulting conspicuous consumption brought about by economic monopolies would lay the groundwork for the sustainability crisis we face today.

The dawn of the information age has thankfully brought on an awareness that only existed in the fringes before. The “hippie movement” of the 1960s and 1970s was a byproduct of overconsumption. They were the original champions of sustainable living, starting natural food co-ops, embracing veganism, rejecting fashion trends in favor of upcycled clothing, growing their food and living off the grid.

Many of the Fortune 500 companies of yore have forgotten that long-term success and a responsibility to the planet go hand in hand. The world today needs a brave new breed of businesses that understand the cost of this ignorance. For too long, the short-term thinking of large corporations and the culture of quick gains has fueled the linear and wasteful economy.

With millennials taking the reins of industry, the potential for a shift in the way we achieve sustainability is within reach. As this generation begins taking charge and moving into the world’s various positions of power, they are looking at things in a very different way. We can’t rely on governments to drive change. Most political leaders are only focused on issues that drive the election cycle.

Businesses have the power to drive long-term changes, good or bad, as history has shown. There is no one easy answer or one right way to turn the clock back. However, to carry on towards a sustainable and prosperous future, our very DNA must be wired for long-term planning. The world of business, through its many facets – from supply chain to corporate culture – has the potential to lead the way.

Here are three things any business can implement:

Stop using single-use plastics

The most visible problem in our world today is single-use plastic. Cheap, disposable plastic products have proliferated our daily lives so much that we rarely think about its impact on the environment. Many governments are passing legislation to limit or ban single-use plastic, and many large corporations such as Nestle, Pepsi and Unilever have committed to reducing packaging waste. But it is not laws that will create a real impact, it is a change in mindset.

When my company instituted a policy banning the use of single-use plastic in all offices across 25 countries, we were expecting resistance. But we were surprised by how readily the staff embraced and welcomed the change. The run-up to the policy was preempted by an ongoing information campaign about the harmful effects of single-use plastic, as well as campaigns to encourage employees to reuse and recycle. When the actual policy was announced, instead of being viewed as a hassle, employees took pride in knowing that they were part of a larger movement.

Reduce environmental impacts across the supply chain

With growing awareness about the negative impact of everything from fast fashion to fast food consumers are beginning to realize that they can only vote with their dollars when it comes to sustainable change. But even the most environmentally conscious shoppers cannot be sure if their purchases actually made an impact. Many companies may seem outwardly eco-friendly, but their supply chain tells a different story.

A McKinsey report says 90 percent of the environmental impact of companies come from their supply chain. By working with the right partners and incorporating environmental compliance policies that reduce wastage and use minimal resources, companies can reduce not just the impact of their activities on the environment but also achieve cost reduction and improve operational efficiency.

Invest in vulnerable communities, which could benefit from a circular economy the most

Food and water scarcity are two of the biggest challenges humanity will face in the coming years. Just a few months ago, Chennai, India, (pictured above) came close to running out of water. This follows Cape Town in South Africa, which became the first major metropolis to deplete most of its water resources.

A U.N. report released in August said climate change and poor management practices are threatening the world's farmlands and food security. As the global population continues to grow, and depleted aquifers and changing weather patterns impact crop yield, we are fast moving towards unmanageable food shortages.

Businesses have a responsibility to create meaningful value in the local communities in which they operate. Companies must look for ways to help by investing in projects that make infrastructure systems more resilient, support community development and encourage waste reduction. Investing in resilience is not just about roads or buildings, but also about investing in people and communities for sustainable development that improves health, education and livelihood. 

The future of business

The British East India Company was once the treasury of the British Empire. In its prime, it owned most of the world and controlled half of all of the world’s trade. Today it only exists in history books. For companies of today to leave a legacy for the future, they need to think beyond the next quarterly earnings. As is evident from the circular economy of our ancestors, certain practices that have been a part of the human experience for centuries were forgotten in our pursuit for material progress. Businesses forgot that they needed a reason to exist beyond profit. Like the circular economy of our past, profits must always be plowed back into the land to support a sustainable model for society.

Image credit: Adityan Ramkumar/Unsplash

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At BSR, San Jose Mayor Praises Corporate Focus on the Homeless in Wealthy Silicon Valley

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Many of the world’s largest tech giants call Silicon Valley home, but more than 9,000 people find themselves homeless in Santa Clara County each night.   

“At a time of such prosperity, that’s a point of shame for all of us,” San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo told 700 business leaders Wednesday at the annual conference for the nonprofit Business of Social Responsibility (BSR).

The two-term Democrat lauded San Jose as a center of innovation that expands beyond tech to include fruit cocktail and Eggo frozen waffles.

The BSR audience erupted into applause when Liccardo called out Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins for starting a trend when the San Jose-based networking giant committed $50 million to end homelessness in Santa Clara County in five years.

“I’m grateful that he really started what has been an incredible wave of corporate commitments since,” said Liccardo, adding that Silicon Valley Housing Trust is putting the funding to work.

Other companies that have donated tens of millions of dollars to affordable-housing initiatives in the notoriously pricey Bay Area include Facebook, Google, LinkedIn and Salesforce. 

While acknowledging “there’s no app to solve homelessness,” the mayor gave an enthusiastic review to several technology platforms leveraging their ability to reach an at-risk urban population:

  • Mastercard’s “Cash for Trash” platform gives people who tidy up city homeless encampments a card loaded with money to buy food and living necessities. “We’re grateful to Mastercard for stepping up,” said Liccardo.
  • IBM worked with the city of San Jose’s housing department to develop an online rent registry to track whether rental prices are compliant with city rent control policies. 
  • eBay is helping high school students make smart decisions to increase the likelihood they will attend college.  A pilot project, San Jose Promise, deposits virtual scholarship dollars that can convert to actual college scholarships. Incentives work better than lectures, said the mayor.
  • Airbnb’s “Open Homes” disaster response program was launched in San Jose, allowing those displaced by flooding in San Jose to stay in vacant rental units.  Similar work is under way to address the growing issue of college homelessness, said Liccardo.

Also at BSR, a new survey revealing a dramatic rise in companies that cite climate change as a “very significant” sustainability focus, 52 percent in 2019 versus 14 percent last year.  Beyond climate change top focus areas are ethics and integrity, and diversity and inclusion, according to the State of Sustainable Business in 2019, produced by BSR and GlobeScan.

In her commentary about the research, BSR Chief Operating Officer Laura Gitman said CSR has matured significantly since the inaugural research study in 2008. 

“It would have been inconceivable (in 2008) for influential corporate leaders and major investors to engage in a very public, candid, and existential conversation questioning the future viability of capitalism, the foundation of our economic and social systems for the past three centuries,” Gitman said. 

“We see influential CEOs declaring that ‘capitalism as we know it is dead’ and calling for a new capitalism that values purpose alongside profit. The CEOs of the Business Roundtable have essentially called for a redefinition of the purpose of a corporation, embracing a form of ‘conscious capitalism’ in which the need to deliver value to all stakeholders has surpassed the previously unchallenged primacy of shareholders,” she continued.

Photo credit of San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo: Dave Armon

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